Unusual Aesthetic Majolica Tile
 
  • Style/technique: Aesthetic majolica
  • Manufacturer: Gibbons Hinton
  • Pattern number: 409
  • Dimensions: 6" x 6"
  • Date: circa 1895

 

A super aesthetic movement tile in the Morris & Co 'Longden' format of quadrants with alternating floral sprigs and stylised flowerheads. Inspired design, lively floral sprigs and bold stylised flowerheads. Clearly aesthetic designs are relatively uncommon in majolica. In two somewhat unusual colours, mustard and 'bondi' blue though I doubt it was called bondi blue in 1895.

This design can be seen on the catalogue page reproduced in Blanchett.

Gibbons Hinton are one of the lesser known companies but their tiles are almost always super manufacturing quality and great designs too. Owen Gibbons trained at the South Kensington School of Art and was for a time curator of the Royal Architectural Museum in London before becoming head of the Coalbrookdale School of Art in Shropshire. Whilst there he designed a number of tiles for Maw & Co, this may be one of his designs too.

Verso very clean with moulded pattern number and distinctive Gibbons Hinton locks.


Condition: Near perfect
Price: £65 (approx $102)
Ref: #02819

One very tiny chip top right corner.

UK Special Delivery £73

US and World Airsure £80

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Condition: Very fine
Price: £60 (approx $95)
Ref: 02819B

Very tiny chips left corners, two minute chips left edge, a little very light wear on the raised line just above the bottom edge otherwise surface condition is perfect.

UK Special Delivery £68

US and World Airsure £75

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The image is full size at 72 dpi (about 430 pixels wide) in maximum quality JPEG format. A larger 120 dpi image also in maximum quality JPEG format can be forwarded by email if required.

The image is a little oversize rather than cropped close to the edges so that the edges can easily be seen and any chips etc can be quickly spotted. Other marks described are usually not visible at all when the tile is viewed straight as one normally sees it and can only be seen with a critical eye when the tile is tilted to catch imperfections in reflected light. For more details of how we describe marks see Condition.

 

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